The sacred MakhaBucha (Magh Puja) ceremony, one of the five most revered events for Buddhists in Thailand, was gracefully conducted by the esteemed Somdet and other senior monks of Thailand. The ceremony took place at the very venue where the holy relics of Lord Buddha and his two disciples, brought from India, are enshrined, symbolizing the profound spiritual connection between Thailand and the roots of Buddhism.

MakhaBucha Day (Magha Puja) is a religious celebration marking Lord Buddha’s teachings to his disciples. MakhaBucha is celebrated according to the traditional lunar calendar, on the day of full moon of the third lunar month.

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The term makha comes from the word “Magha” in Pali and it refers to the third lunar month, while bucha can translate as “to worship,” both of which are derived from the Pali language used in Buddhist scripture. Therefore, the term MakhaBucha refers to a day intended for worshiping on the third lunar month.

MakhaBucha, the first important religious festival in the Buddhist calendar, takes place in nations including Thailand, Laos and Cambodia, where the majority of Buddhists practice Theravada Buddhism, also known as “Buddhism of the south”.

 

People visiting the pavilion in large numbers to pay their respects to the Holy Relics brought from India for 26-day exposition in Thailand.

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